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Found 4 results

  1. Hi,I need some help for migratin advise.My boyfriend is 30 years old and have a bachelor degree of electronic engineer but worked as project engineer for the past 5 years. So we should apply for electronic engineer or project engineer? And if our qualification is a non-credited,can we still apply for this? 1- can we apply for the skilled assement without IELTS result? 2-How long does the skilled assement take?
  2. Hello Perth Poms! Please be gentle as this is my first post on this forum. Me and my partner are looking to relocate to Perth within the next few years and are looking to get some advice from all you knowledgable folk. First a little about us. I currently work as a Graduate Structural Engineer for an Oil and Gas services company in Aberdeen. My girlfriend is a qualified nurse currently working in theatre (known as a scrub scout in Oz). We are both 23 and graduated in July 2014 (this will become relavant later) and looking for a fresh start in beautiful Perth Australia. In terms of Visas, I feel we may have two options. These are: Option 1: Apply for a Skilled - Recognised Graduate Visa (subclass 476). I am able to apply for this as I have a Masters degree in Civil Engineering from the University of Strathclyde (Washington Accord institution). This Visa is currently around £250, therefore it is significantly cheaper than a skilled migrant visa. However this Visa is only temporary (18 months). I also have to apply before the end of July 2016 which we intend on doing anyway. Do you think this type of visa could hinder my chances of securing a graduate position? Option 2: Either myself or my partner get sponsered on a skilled migrant visa. ( In the current Oil and Gas market, this would likely be my other half....) Do you think with this visa being permanent would help my chances of securing a position? As I mentioned previously, the oil and gas market is rather bleak at the moment, therefore I am more than willing to go into onshore construction works if need be. Is there any recent graduates currently in Perth who could give me any advice on applying? Do graduate programs typically hire international graduates? Thanks for your help in advance. Regards Craig
  3. IMPORTANT NOTICE Changes to Priority Processing - 23 September 2009 The Minister for Immigration and Citizenship, Senator Chris Evans, has set new processing priorities for certain skilled migration visa applications. The new direction will apply from 23 September 2009 and applies to new applications, and those already lodged or in the final stages of processing, and replaces the previous Priority Processing Direction (No.40) which commenced on 1 January 2009. The new direction gives priority to applicants who are sponsored by an employer, have a nominated occupation which is in critical need and are either sponsored by a state/territory government or by a family member. Different priority processing arrangements for Skilled-Graduate (Subclass 485) visa applicants apply. The Migration Act 1958 contains powers by which the Minister can consider and finalise visa applications in an order of priority that the Minister considers appropriate. Departmental officers are required to follow this Ministerial direction, which applies to every stage of visa processing. All General Skilled Migration (GSM) visas are subject to the new Ministerial direction, except for: · Skilled – Recognised Graduate (Subclass 476); · Skilled – Designated Area – Sponsored (Subclass 883); · Skilled – Regional (Subclass 887). The direction gives the following processing priorities (with highest priority listed first) to GSM applications: 1. applications from persons who are employer sponsored under the Employer Nominated Scheme and the Regional Sponsored Migration Scheme; 2. applications from persons who are nominated by a State/Territory government and have nominated an occupation on the Critical Skills List (CSL); 3. applications from persons who are sponsored by family and who have nominated an occupation on the CSL; 4. applications from persons who are neither nominated nor sponsored but who have nominated an occupation on the CSL; 5. applications from persons who are nominated by a State/Territory government and have not nominated an occupation on the CSL; 6. (i) applications from persons who have nominated an occupation on the Migration Occupation in Demand List (MODL); and (ii) applications from persons who are sponsored by family and have not nominated an occupation on the CSL; 7. all other applications are to be processed in the order in which they are received. The direction also gives the following processing priority to Skilled-Graduate (Subclass 485) visa applicants (with highest priority listed first): 1. applications from persons who have completed an Australian Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) at an Australian educational institution in Australia; 2. applications from persons who have nominated an occupation on the CSL; 3. applications from persons who have completed an Australian Bachelor degree and Australian Masters degree at an Australian educational institution in Australia; 4. applications from persons who have completed an Australian Bachelor degree and Australian Honours degree (at least upper second class level) at an Australian educational institution in Australia; 5. applications from persons who have completed either an Australian Bachelor degree or an Australian Masters degree at an Australian educational institution in Australia; 6. all other valid applications are to be processed in the order in which they are received. The complete list of occupations on the CSL is available on the department’s website: http://www.immi.gov.au/skilled/general-skilled-migration/pdf/critical-skills-list.pdf Application Processing Times If your nominated occupation is on the Critical Skills List (CSL) and you have applied or will apply for an onshore or offshore GSM visa before the end of 2009, it is estimated that your visa application will be finalised within 12 months from your lodgement date. If your nominated occupation is not on the Critical Skills List (CSL) and you have applied for an offshore GSM visa or intend to apply for an offshore GSM visa later in 2009, it is unlikely that your visa application will be finalised before the end of 2012. If your nominated occupation is not on the CSL and you applied for an onshore GSM visa or intend to apply for an onshore GSM visa later in 2009, it is unlikely that your visa application will be finalised before the end of 2011. Your ‘nominated occupation' is the occupation you nominated at the time you lodged your application and cannot be changed. These application processing times are indicative only and are based on the current visa application rate, the Priority Processing Direction (in effect from 23 September 2009), and the availability of places in the Migration Program. Please do not contact the Department to request your application be exempted from the Minister’s Priority Processing Direction. Departmental officers must adhere to the Minister’s Direction and you will be contacted by the Department when your application is allocated to a case officer. Processing priorities are subject to change. Any changes to these priorities or processing times will be updated on the Department’s website at: http://www.immi.gov.au/skilled/general-skilled-migration/whats-new.htm As explained above the Department is processing applications according to Ministerial Direction No. 42 - Order of consideration - certain Skilled Migration visas. The Department anticipates that a small number of applications from persons who are nominated by a State/Territory government and have not nominated an occupation on the CSL will be finalised this program year. Finalisations will focus on applications where health and character checks have been requested by the case officer. Priority Processing Exemptions Visa Subclasses 476 and 887 are exempt from the priority processing changes. Applications under these subclasses will continue to be processed in the order in which they were received by the Department – the following subclass by application lodgement date identifies cases currently being considered: Visa Subclass Month/Year Lodgement VF 476 (paper): 29 November 2009 VF 476 (e-lodged): 29 November 2009 VB 887 (paper): 11 November 2009 OTHER PROCESSING NEWS MEDICAL RESULTS If you have undertaken your medical examination at Health Services Australia (HSA), please do not post your medical results to us unless your case officer requests you to do so. Please store your results in a secure place and do not open the sealed envelope.
  4. The Rudd Government’s changes to the temporary skilled migration scheme are delivering the skills Australia needs with new figures showing almost a quarter of all primary subclass 457 visas granted in the first five months of 2009–10 were for workers in the health care and social assistance sectors. Registered nurses, general medical practitioners and medical practitioners in training top the list of occupations, along with computing professionals, for primary visas granted to temporary skilled overseas workers to November 30. The average nominated base salary increased sharply to $85 300 compared to $74 700 for the same period last year and almost 90 per cent of primary visas granted were to managers and administrators, professionals or associated professionals. Approximately 26 per cent of all primary visa applications granted have been to citizens of the United Kingdom, with 14 per cent to citizens of India and eight per cent to US citizens. However, at the end of November 2009, there were 73 000 subclass 457 primary visa holders in Australia – 11 per cent lower than the end of November 2008 and 12 per cent lower than the peak of 83 130 at end of February 2009. In the current economic climate, the Rudd Government recognises the need for industry to access temporary skilled overseas labour where there are demonstrated skills shortages but is committed to ensuring they are not employed ahead of local workers or used to undermine Australian wages and conditions. These latest figures show that the subclass 457 visa program is responding to the changes made by the Rudd Government to protect local jobs. The Rudd Government’s worker protection laws, which came into effect on 14 September 2009, includes the requirement to pay overseas workers market salary rates, so that subclass 457 visa holders are on the same wages and conditions of employment as those provided to an Australian worker undertaking equivalent work in the same workplace. The laws also provide greater protection for more vulnerable subclass 457 visa holders to ensure they are not exploited. The legislation increased sanctions, including fines, for those who breach their obligations. In addition, skills assessments for subclass 457 visa applicants in trade occupations and chefs were progressively introduced from 1 July 2009 to maintain the integrity of the scheme. Media Release URL: http://www.minister.immi.gov.au /media/media-releases/2010/ce10002.htm Last update: 12 January 2010 at 10:02 AEST