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how to emigrate as a family including my mum


angela33

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Hi we are a family of 4 with 2 children. None of us wish to leave my mum in uk we all want to start a new life together. Can you please advise if this is possible? My mum is 57. She doesn't work but would be willing to in Australia to pay her own way. We are also willing for her to live with us and support her that way. I'm an only child so she has no one else here except me and my daughters. Can anyone let me know if there is a cost implication to bringing my mum even though we'll support her and she is our support network for our children?

 

Can anyone recommend a good company who can deal with the process without costing a fortune please? .

 

sorry for such a long post. Its the 1st time ive been on here.

 

Thanks

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Guest guest10912

I am afraid there is absolutely no way you can bring your mum with you on your visa. However after you have been settled in Australia for a couple if years you may be able to sponsor her for a parent visa, it is very expensive though, about $45k or so, I don't recall exactly but it is about that.

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hi, Rupert is right, we are doing the same. We will be joining our son next year and it costs a fortune we are doing a 143 visa which is taking 2 years and you have to wait 2 years to make sure you are a resident and settled. Plus it is not just the visa costs you have to be earning enough to sponsor your mum and leave around £5k

in a bond for 10 years to cover medicare etc. plus she will not be able to claim any benefits.

if you try a parent visa they can take up to 15/ 20 years

not very easy for us parents !!

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[h=3]I am absolutely no expert but perhaps if you can prove she's dependant on you and you apply for a 189 visa it may be possible? this is from immigration website:

however as I said I'm no expert so perhaps consult an immigration agent for a free first consultation? good luck,

J x

 

Other dependent relatives[/h]A dependent relative (other than a dependent child) can be included in your visa application when you lodge your application.

You cannot add a dependent relative to a points tested skilled visa after you lodge your application.

To include your other dependent relative(s) in your application, there are requirements and evidence that must be provided to prove dependency.

To be considered a dependent relative you must prove they:

 

  • have no other relative able to care for them in their own country
  • are not currently married, engaged or in a de facto relationship
  • usually are a resident in your household
  • depend on you for financial support for their basic needs and you have supported them for a substantial period
  • depend on you more than any other person or source.

Acceptable forms of proof include:

 

  • a certified copy of their birth certificate and proof of their relationship to you
  • proof that the relative lives in your household
  • proof that your relative has been dependent on you for at least the last 12 months.
  • if your relative is divorced, legally separated or widowed, you must provide certified copies of supporting evidence, such as:

    • the document of legal divorce
    • the document of legal separation
    • the death certificate of the deceased partner.

[h=3]Newborn children[/h]

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Guest guest10912
I am absolutely no expert but perhaps if you can prove she's dependant on you and you apply for a 189 visa it may be possible? this is from immigration website:

however as I said I'm no expert so perhaps consult an immigration agent for a free first consultation? good luck,

J x

 

Other dependent relatives

 

A dependent relative (other than a dependent child) can be included in your visa application when you lodge your application.

You cannot add a dependent relative to a points tested skilled visa after you lodge your application.

To include your other dependent relative(s) in your application, there are requirements and evidence that must be provided to prove dependency.

To be considered a dependent relative you must prove they:

 

  • have no other relative able to care for them in their own country
  • are not currently married, engaged or in a de facto relationship
  • usually are a resident in your household
  • depend on you for financial support for their basic needs and you have supported them for a substantial period
  • depend on you more than any other person or source.

Acceptable forms of proof include:

 

  • a certified copy of their birth certificate and proof of their relationship to you
  • proof that the relative lives in your household
  • proof that your relative has been dependent on you for at least the last 12 months.
  • if your relative is divorced, legally separated or widowed, you must provide certified copies of supporting evidence, such as:

    • the document of legal divorce
    • the document of legal separation
    • the death certificate of the deceased partner.

Newborn children

 

 

It is not possible for anyone from the UK to claim their parent is dependent on them because of the welfare state. This is a non starter and is not going to help I am afraid.

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I thought parents of only children had a better chance as my mum is my link and visa versa? That's how someone I know through someone got her parents over. I'll check it out with an advisor. I'm determined not to give up but I won't give my mum up and my kids lose their only nan either.

 

Thanks

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I thought parents of only children had a better chance as my mum is my link and visa versa? That's how someone I know through someone got her parents over. I'll check it out with an advisor. I'm determined not to give up but I won't give my mum up and my kids lose their only nan either.

 

Thanks

 

There is a better chance based on the balance of children in Australia and the rest of the world. As an only child your Mum is eligible to apply for a parent visa but you have to have been resident in Australia for 2 years or more and they are costly unless she applies for the non-contributory parent visa but waiting can be 15 years. If your Mum was elderly she could have applied under an Elderly Parent visa and could have bridged but she doesn't meet the age criteria and again you would have to have been resident for 2 years or more and there is a very long wait if she goes down the non-contributory route. I'm afraid an agent will give you the same advise but by all means check it out.

 

My MiL is applying at the moment and she can apply for either as her hubbie is "elderly". It's costing her an arm and a leg! She's able to apply as my SIL has been resident in Perth for 6+ years otherwise she would have to wait until we had been there 2+ years.

 

What you could do is once you've moved to Australia she could come and visit you on an extended tourist visa. This would alleviate some of the problems with the 2 year wait and once 2 years are up she could apply for a contributory parent visa and still visit you whilst her visa was being processed.

http://www.immi.gov.au/visitors/tourist/676/parents-longer-tourist-visa.htm

 

Lou :)

Edited by Lou8670
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Thanks very much. Sorry for all the questions. I don't think the 2 years would suit unfortunately. We rely on my mum for childcare while we work here so in a country where we wouldn't have anyone else to help we'd need her even more :-(

Is there an alternative route we could look at? Such as her coming on her own visa if she uses a trade or training now and coming to start a business that I could do jointly etc?

Any suggestions welcome please.

Thanks

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Thanks very much. Sorry for all the questions. I don't think the 2 years would suit unfortunately. We rely on my mum for childcare while we work here so in a country where we wouldn't have anyone else to help we'd need her even more :-(

Is there an alternative route we could look at? Such as her coming on her own visa if she uses a trade or training now and coming to start a business that I could do jointly etc?

Any suggestions welcome please.

Thanks

 

If she has a skill like nursing then she might be able to go on a 457 visa.

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She could get a skill that qualifies for a 457, but she would be looking at several years of study. The chances of a newly qualified nurse aged 60 getting sponsorship is very low.

 

She can come for holidays of 6 months at a time. Once you have been here two years with her here on holiday there are then ways - though she would not be able to work.

 

Thanks very much. Sorry for all the questions. I don't think the 2 years would suit unfortunately. We rely on my mum for childcare while we work here so in a country where we wouldn't have anyone else to help we'd need her even more :-(

Is there an alternative route we could look at? Such as her coming on her own visa if she uses a trade or training now and coming to start a business that I could do jointly etc?

Any suggestions welcome please.

Thanks

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Guest guest10912
I thought parents of only children had a better chance as my mum is my link and visa versa? That's how someone I know through someone got her parents over. I'll check it out with an advisor. I'm determined not to give up but I won't give my mum up and my kids lose their only nan either.

 

Thanks

 

I can only reiterate post #1. There is absolutely no way that you can bring your mother as a dependent. Bring determined will not change that, you can only look at other options which have already been mentioned. The person you know did not bring her mother over as a dependent, they must have gone for the parent visa which has already been mentioned.

 

Keeping it realistic, the best option is the extended tourist visa followed by a parent visa application after two years and costing $45k.

 

Your mother is too old to get skilled migrant or business visa and it is most unlikely that she would find an employer willing to sponsor, it is pretty hard for 57 year olds to find work at all never mind a sponsorship.

Edited by guest10912
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