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    wild rose    10

    My daugter is 4 in July and in the UK would have been starting full time in the Foundation class at primary school in September one of the youngest in her year. She currently attends the pre-school playgroup 5 mornings each week and is doing really well learning her phonics and numbers, practising writing etc.

     

    On arriving in WA, hopefully in August 14, I understand she will have to return to Long Day Care/Nursery for 6 months before starting Kindy in February 15 as one of the eldest in her year. Is this correct??

     

    She seems so ready for starting school and I'm concerned that returning to long day care/nursery will restrict the development she's already begun in preparation for school. Then she'll have another year of part-time schooling at Kindy (which sounds similar to the pre-school playgroup she's currently with) before actually being able to start at school.

     

    Has anyone else encountered this problem? And is it actually a problem at all?? It may be that long day care tend to cater very well with that kind of learning!

     

    Could you share your experiences of long day care/kindy/pre-primary etc?

     

    Thank you x

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    portlaunay    22
    I'm concerned that returning to long day care/nursery will restrict the development she's already begun in preparation for school. Has anyone else encountered this problem? And is it actually a problem at all?? It may be that long day care tend to cater very well with that kind of learning!

     

    Why? Learning isn't a linear experience or process that follows a predetermined pathway, it's multifaceted and rich, she won't unlearn what she has already covered. Who's to say that this experience will not be significant for her, it is after all only an education system and I think no one could say that one system is right for everyone. If she is one of the older ones in her group it may be that the experience of mentoring and supporting younger children will be extremely valuable for her and she may find herself immersed in subjects she's not yet encountered - rudimentary Italian, music, art, for example.

     

    Don't worry about it, I think she'll have a great time.

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    Plimthing    10

    We have exactly the same situation with our eldest girl. She is way ahead of the others in her class (Oz teachers words) and it appears that the school just lets her coast along. She appears bored of school and not stimulated by the classes at all as it is things she already knows. This may explain her very bad behaviour at moment, but thats a thread for another day!

    To be honest, not overly impressed with the whole schools standard at the moment. I have a friend at work who's wife has taught at both Oz and UK and she thinks the standard is higher here in Oz. He was quite shocked when i laughed and told him my experiences.

    Just my opinion, awaiting to be shot down......or maybe we chose a bad school???

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    portlaunay    22
    We have exactly the same situation with our eldest girl. She is way ahead of the others in her class (Oz teachers words) and it appears that the school just lets her coast along. She appears bored of school and not stimulated by the classes at all as it is things she already knows. This may explain her very bad behaviour at moment, but thats a thread for another day!

    To be honest, not overly impressed with the whole schools standard at the moment. I have a friend at work who's wife has taught at both Oz and UK and she thinks the standard is higher here in Oz. He was quite shocked when i laughed and told him my experiences.

    Just my opinion, awaiting to be shot down......or maybe we chose a bad school???

     

    Not necessarily a bad school; the quality of teaching can vary massively in one school. Have you talked to the teacher about your concerns? Have you talked to the principal? Are there projects in the school she could involve herself in outside of the classroom? Are there other interests outside of school that can challenge her in the way that she needs?

    In my experience the curriculum here is much broader, more creative and competitive. Schools and teachers are not scrutinised as they are with Ofsted and I think that's generally a good thing.

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    Weedolly    13

    To be honest I dont think the education is bad here, its just that there is not so much emphasis put on academic stuff, exams, stats etc while the kiddies are younger, from what I hear it gets quite intense when they get a bit older. Is there any panic if your four year old cant read War and Peace yet? Let the little ones have some fun whilst learning while they are still little!

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    Scot01    11

    Here is a link to show when she will start - http://www.det.wa.edu.au/schoolsandyou/detcms/navigation/life-at-school/kindergarten/?page=5toc5

    On the same link they have 'what will my child learn at Kindy' Teachers are guided by the Early Years Learning Framework for Australia - worth looking at that too. Teacher's need an early childhood qualification to work with children 0-6 and you'll find that many of the day care centres will employ an early childhood teacher who plans an educational programme. Even centres that employ young, inexperienced workers require them to complete a CertIII or IV in early childhood while they are working. Make sure you ask about qualifications of the staff if you are looking for a childcare centre to supplement Kindy.

    There is no way this will restrict her development. The vital thing for the early years is learning through play and developing language skills. parents tend to rate educational progress in terms of how many letters the child knows, what they can count to, how many letter sounds etc but there is so much more to it. There are many things that are developmental, stages young children go through that you can't rush but their understanding develops through play. She won't be the only bright, child in the class I am sure her needs will be catered for.

    You can't rate a whole educational system by a bad teacher/poor school/bad experience. I would talk to the Principal Plimthing if you aren't getting any joy from the teacher. The Early Years learning Framework is based on worldwide research and Australia is up there with many of the best educational systems (Finland/Sweden have spectacular results and kids there don't start formal educational until age 7).

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    wild rose    10

    It's really useful to read other people's perspective, thank you for taking the time to respond. And thank you to Scot1, I'll have a further look at the link you have provided. It'll be interesting to read what they hope to achieve through Kindy.

     

    I imagine the key will be in finding a long day care centre that can continue with the educational stuff alongside the play and I will certainly enquire about any staff qualifications. I'm not suggesting that school's in Oz won't be able to cater for her, I'm sure she'll be fine and they will hopefully provide appropriately challenging tasks whatever her acedemic level (she is only 3 afterall, who knows how she is going to develop!). I think I'm more worried about the fact that her start to full time school is effectively being delayed by nearly a year and a half, from Sep14 until Feb16. She seems so ready for something more than Long Day Care or Kindy. I'm sure she'll be fine, it just seems a shame.

     

    From what I've read school's appear to offer Kindy 5 days per fortnight (often 3 days one week and 2 days the following week). Do you know of any schools offering a place for 5 days each week??

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    PingPongPom    10

    When we first arrived in 2009, two of my 3 children attended the local school and I have to say I was not happy. It has been my main concern and one of the main reasons for returning to UK. In the end we paid for a private school, I think we were paying for the same standard as what you get here in our area of the UK for free, if that makes sense?? the only real problem we have had to face is when we returned to the UK in Feb 2013 my daughter was hit hardest as she was still only in Kindy over in oz and should have had a year of school behind her. She is just starting to catch up to the rest of the class now. There is no phonics in oz, or there wasn't in the Kindy she was at, so she didn't have a clue what everyone was talking about with all oo and ee sounds etc. However, had we stayed, it wouldn't have been a problem of course! And now that we are going back, we know we cannot afford for all three to go to private school so will look at just paying for high school for my eldest and try and find a decent primary for the other two. I do think it also depends on the child. My middle son is very studious and likes homework! He's in year 4 and in highest groups in the class for maths and reading. But he was top of the class in oz too, because that's just him. Whereas my eldest, just in first year at secondary, would rather be outside with his mates than doing homework. If you intend to stay in oz, the education is fine, but if you intend on coming back, kids will have to work harder to catch up, in my opinion anyway.

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    wild rose    10
    When we first arrived in 2009, two of my 3 children attended the local school and I have to say I was not happy. It has been my main concern and one of the main reasons for returning to UK. In the end we paid for a private school, I think we were paying for the same standard as what you get here in our area of the UK for free, if that makes sense?? the only real problem we have had to face is when we returned to the UK in Feb 2013 my daughter was hit hardest as she was still only in Kindy over in oz and should have had a year of school behind her. She is just starting to catch up to the rest of the class now. There is no phonics in oz, or there wasn't in the Kindy she was at, so she didn't have a clue what everyone was talking about with all oo and ee sounds etc. However, had we stayed, it wouldn't have been a problem of course! And now that we are going back, we know we cannot afford for all three to go to private school so will look at just paying for high school for my eldest and try and find a decent primary for the other two. I do think it also depends on the child. My middle son is very studious and likes homework! He's in year 4 and in highest groups in the class for maths and reading. But he was top of the class in oz too, because that's just him. Whereas my eldest, just in first year at secondary, would rather be outside with his mates than doing homework. If you intend to stay in oz, the education is fine, but if you intend on coming back, kids will have to work harder to catch up, in my opinion anyway.

     

    Hi, can you share which school(s) in particular you were unhappy with? By pm if you're not comfortable posting. Did u feel content with the private school in comparison?

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    PingPongPom    10
    Hi, can you share which school(s) in particular you were unhappy with? By pm if you're not comfortable posting. Did u feel content with the private school in comparison?

     

    Hi, no I don't mind sharing, if there's one thing I've learnt from the first time around is everyone is different, has different expectations etc, so it's just personal choice. We were in Secret Harbour, so they did 1 term at SH primary. My son spent 8 weeks making paper aeroplanes. I was very happy with the private school, but like I say, I believe we were paying for the standard you get here for free. But then we only tried that one school.

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    Scot01    11

    I'm glad you said that your 'they don't do phonics in Oz' statement was based on only one school because they do do phonics. It is a vital part of learning to read. Schools where I have worked the children were assessed in preprimary on letter recognition, letter sounds, phonological processing skills, and that formed the basis of groups for Year 1. May be you were just unlucky with your teacher/school/group of kids in the class.

    To check out a school go here - http://www.myschool.edu.au/

    Type in a suburb and all the schools will come up. Click on a school. Look at the graph that says Results in numbers. Green means the school is above the National average in Naplan testing (like SATS) and red means below.

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    PingPongPom    10

    Hi, thanks for the link. I can't believe both schools in SH are performing below the average, one very much worse than the other!! How can we have been so unlucky!! It's a useful tool.

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    wild rose    10

    Thanks Scot1, I had seen this website listing the ratings already but wasn't sure how much it actually refected what was actually happening in the schools. It sounds like they *are* pretty reflective considering PingPongPom has a poor experience with a school in Secret Harbour and the ratings show are they are performing below average. This conversation has reinforced my decision to ensure I settle in a suburb with a school with a good rating!

     

    Thanks everyone for your help :)

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    jackboots    50

    I'm a bit confused by these graphs , the school my daughter attends only opened last year for the age group given and is definitely pink . It is also known as a good school ?

     

    I have friends whose children are thriving in the SH schools . I have looked at that website before and do believe some teachers don't hit the mark with certain children , does it mean they are a bad teacher ? Or just they are not on the same wavelength ?

    When we were younger you just went to the catchment area school and got on with it ( a rural village for me ) , our children are lucky that we try to put them in schools and area's that we feel will better them :)

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