verystormy

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  1. It isn't that simple. The visa that would apply is a 457 visa which has no age limit. However, this needs to be sponsored by a company and they need to do the first half of the application called the nomination and if they haven't previously sponsored also become approved for sponsoring. They also need to pay their half of the fees. Then, if a nomination is successful, you do your part of the application. The process from a high risk country, which is think SA is, can take many months, particularly if they haven't sponsored before. However, even before that starts, not everyone can get a sponsored visa. You still need to check that your occupation is on one of the two skilled occupation lists. These have in the recent weeks undergone massive changes with hundreds of occupations removed. Then, even if you find a job, with a company willing and able to sponsor and you obtain a visa, the 457 visa is only temporary and lasts a maximum of 4 years. You would n0t be eligible for a permanent visa, as on July 1st the age limit for company sponsored permanent visas is being reduced to 45. Never take advice from people such as recruitment agents as generally, they haven't a clue. If you want advice on if you have any options for independent or state sponsored visas then speak to a registered migration agent. It is true that most people can not get an independent visa after the age of 45 due to points, but not everyone.
  2. Have you checked to see if you qualify for a visa to work in Australia?
  3. I would say if someone has already been granted sponsorship, then it will be ok. If not granted, then they could be refused, but it isn't clear yet
  4. WA has just slashed its skilled occupation list to just 18 occupations with a lot of them, including all nursing, being only eligible for 489 visas
  5. Camilla is wonderful and a regular member of the forum. You will find her contact details here: https://www.perthpoms.com/profile/193-new-life-down-under/?wr=eyJhcHAiOiJmb3J1bXMiLCJtb2R1bGUiOiJmb3J1bXMtY29tbWVudCIsImlkXzEiOjE4NDQ0LCJpZF8yIjoxNDE2MDF9
  6. I will throw in a couple of other things you need to think about. You say he is taking a pay cut, now unless you are living in the South East of the UK, you are likely to find things significantly more expensive, particularly housing. For example, even with the downturn in WA, rent on an average house will be about $420 a week. The other one to consider is your child's education on returning. If you stayed 4 years, he would be year 11 on returning. Not an ideal time, as in the UK he would be mid way through A levels, except that Australia don't do A levels. Also, he needs to be resident in the UK for three years prior to starting university or be treated as an international student.
  7. You automatically have dual citizenship. You must travel on an Australian passport to leave and enter Australia. If you don't have a British passport on entering the UK you will be issued a 3 month visa.
  8. I don't know which agent you are using, but the comment that the current changes with 457's are only discussions is totally wrong. The changes are already being implemented, to the extent that the department are refunding people who have recently applied and are no longer eligible. As for manipulating PR somehow, sounds very worrisome as you either qualify or don't. What is his occupation and how old is he?
  9. You need to start it now! You are already pushing it timing wise! Yes there is a risk, but, this isn't something that can be left until last minute. There is a fair bit of processing and don't forget the pooch will need to go to quarantine and Perth doesn't have one, so he / she will have to go to Melbourne or Sydney, do their quarantine and be transported back west. Give Pet Air a call, Bob is the MD and is a regular member of the forum and they are the only pet shipping company ran by vets.
  10. Hi, yes, it was me selling our house. We moved last May and haven't regretted any of it. Now live in a tiny Scottish village. Everywhere can and does get mozzies. Generally they are worse in land, though any areas of fresh water will cause them. Dawesville isn't any worse than any where else because of the sea breeze. Though old Dawesville which is around the Peel is bad as it is on the other side of a hill which prevents the breeze and next to the inlet. Though the worst I have ever been bitten was in the city centre of Perth and on Cottesloe beach! Same with flies, which can be a major headache. Bush fires are a consideration, though not just inland areas - anywhere where there is a large amount of trees - such as nature reserves and national parks. Though you would be surprised how close to the city they can get. I always remember a couple of years ago watching a big storm come in with lots of lightening and then a few hours later it being replaced by massive plumes of smoke as a town was consumed not far from where we lived. I have also known trains being cancelled into Perth because of them and Perth city center being covered in smoke from nearby fires. The major considerations is where you will all be working, how long you are prepared to commute and budget. For example, if you are working south of the city, then Alkimos would be a very long commute, same the other way, if working north of the city, then Dawesville would be a long trip. Ultimatly, I would not get too hung up on an area yet. It is too hard until you actually visit. For example, I remember when we moved and we were certain we had got it down to 2-3 suburbs where we were sure we wanted to live. Then we arrived and looked around and these were the 2-3 suburbs we liked least and the one we ended up in was the one we had never considered.
  11. To be honest, you can get them anywhere. Though generally, closer to the beach and the wind the better.
  12. well, you say nothing is permanent and that is certainly true of 457 visas. It is important you fully appreciate this is a temporary visa and has no automatic path to anything else, in fact they have just made it harder to obtain a permanent visa for 457 holders. it is not a visa I recommend for families because of its issues. I am hoping you are aware it is tied to the employer and should he lose his job for any reason, you would all have 60 days to leave the country. I certainly would not recommend buying a property. There are also other issues such as you will be charged 4000 per year for education and partners of 457 holders can have difficulty getting work - bear in mind WA is in recession at the moment. As for is it worth it. That will vary a lot for different people and for different reasons. Oz is a very nice place, though it is still just another first world country with first world pluses and misuses. You still have to clean the toilet, buy the groceries and all the usual stuff With costs, it depends on what you are used to. Though generally, if he has taken a pay cut, then unless you are moving from an expensive part of the south east England it will seem expensive.
  13. I can only comment on two. Pinjarra and Dawesville. We lived in Dawesville for 8 years until last year and loved our time there to the extent we built a house there. The beach is one of the best in the area and the only patroled one. The surf rescue do a fair few things and of course children can join from a very young age. There is also the golf club which as well as the restaurant and bar, do a range of events during summer such as concerts. Pinjarra is nice to visit, but I wouldn't live there. It can be very rough in areas and has a high crime rate.
  14. Hi and welcome to the forum. The first thing you need to do is get your diploma topped up to a degree. Once that is done, you need to obtain a positive skills assessment. At the same time you need to calculate your points. This needs to be done carefully as an over claim can result in a refusal. At this stage many people find they are short of points and the most common way to boost them is to take an English test such as ilets. With regard your husband, there would be nothing stopping him applying for the police, however, they are very oversubscribed and new officers often find they have to work and live in remote areas initially. With regard to yourself, I am not sure if nurse practitioner exist in Oz. I have never come across it, so you may need to look at hospital roles.
  15. High and welcome to the forum. I am guessing you have a permanent visa sorted? Teaching jobs for subjects other than maths and science are generally tight.