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verystormy

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Everything posted by verystormy

  1. verystormy

    Typical Rental Periods

    Furnished rentals are fairly thin on the ground in Oz, it isn't like the UK. Most will be there for short stay / holiday type lets. As a result, there usually expensive compared to longer leases. Generally, people moving over will rent one of these for a month or so while they find a normal unfurnished rental. In the mean time, people will buy some cheap basics to get through the gap between moving into a unfurnished place and their own things arriving. For example, IKEA do a kitchen starter pack which has pretty much everything you need for a very small amount of money. It will be the school summer holidays in January, so that will help with the kids schools, but yes, it should be fine to register them while in short term accommodation
  2. You need to check which list the occupation of social worker is currently on. Look here. Homeaffairs.gov.au If it is on the long term list, then she may be eligible for a 189 visa. This is an independent skilled permanent visa. The issue though is that she will need to carefully calculate points. This is where many people have an issue. Although the technical minimum requirement is 65, in reality, nobody is getting invited with less than 80. This can be very hard to get. If she can, then she needs to obtain a positive skills assessment for her occupation. She will need ILETS and will probably need a maximum score. However, the points system is being tweaked in November. As a result I would stronBly recommend you speak to a good registered migration agent to discuss the options. Camilla who runs http://www.newlifedownunder.com.au/ is very good
  3. verystormy

    Primary Teaching question

    Welcome to the forum It is an awkward one. My gut reaction would say no, as they are looking at time spent at degree level or above. But, I would run it past a good migration agent. Camilla at http://www.newlifedownunder.com.au would be a good option. You would also need to look carefully at the points as you wouldn't have any on graduating for experience and while 65 is the minimum, the reality is you may need significantly more.
  4. verystormy

    Better to go on UK or Irish passport?

    Points, occupation and and other qualifying factors.
  5. verystormy

    Better to go on UK or Irish passport?

    It makes zero difference.
  6. verystormy

    Visa 407 and primary school - help!

    It isn't the school that charges, but the state. The current fee is $4000 per year.
  7. verystormy

    190 Visa Processing Times

    Have you checked the WA skilled lists as at present the state requires you to have either studied in WA or have a job offer for most occupations. https://migration.wa.gov.au/SiteCollectionDocuments/Final State nomination migration program criteria - Feb 2019 update.pdf
  8. You need to gain registration as a nurse in Australia prior to skills assessment. You will need to swat up to gain the maximum points for English as this is critically important, particularly for a 189 visa as 75 points is going to be the minimum to get an invite. Personally I am a big fan of using an agent to guide you through the process.
  9. That will get a quick invite. However, do make sure you have calculated points correctly as 95 with a max ILETS score is unusually high and ovet alimony a single point gets a refusal (loss of fee) and potentially even a ban on reapplying
  10. verystormy

    Skills Assessment done. What next?

    Camilla of http://www.newlifedownunder.com.au is very highly recommended and is a long time member of the forum. She is based in Perth, but that is not an issue as generally agents will not see you face to face and instead prefer things by email. Though you can call her.
  11. Points are locked in at the time of application. How many points does he have?
  12. verystormy

    Skills Assessment done. What next?

    Yes, you should study for it. I have seen even teachers fail more than once. Also, the visa process is a sort of competition, with those that have the highest points being invited first and the lowest points potentially never getting invited. So, getting as many points as possible from things like ILETS is important.
  13. verystormy

    Skills Assessment done. What next?

    I am a big fan of using an agent as after so many years on the forum I have seen applications made with an error resulting in a refusal. Have you done ILETS?
  14. The advice is always use a registered migration agent. If you think ACS are pedantic. Wait till you actually deal with migration. Accept, they don't give the chance to redo do things.mthey will keep that big expensive visa fee. Issue a refusal and potentially even a ban on reapplying.
  15. verystormy

    PR; 189 vs 186 visa

    I would strongly recommend using an agent. The downside of employer sponsored is that they are on of the most common visas to be refused.
  16. verystormy

    Newbie, any advice please?

    How about getting married? You can get a prospective marriage visa, which would allow you to go to Oz to get married and then apply for a partner visa.
  17. verystormy

    Newbie, any advice please?

    It sounds feasible to me, though there may be other options. In some states in Oz it is possible to register a relationship which means you don't need to have lived together for 12 months.
  18. verystormy

    UK National Insurance and State Pension

    https://www.gov.uk/national-insurance-if-you-go-abroad
  19. verystormy

    Residency vs working visa, suburbs, teaching and GP

    As mentioned above. I think you are confused on visas. First, you have to be under the age of 31 for a working holiday visa. Second, you can not have dependants. The working visa you may be mixing this with is a employer sponsored visa. This is a temporary visa sponsored by an employer for up to four years. This does allow dependants to be included. However. The main applicant must work full time. There are a number of down sides with this visa. For example, you are not eligible for any government benefits. The state will charge you for education for children. The visa is tied to the employer, so, if the main applicant loses their job for any reason (leaves their job as well) the visa is also lost. The most important thing is that it is a temporary visa. Even if you want to stay later, that may not be your decision. A permanent visa offers much more security. It also allows you to do what ever you wish regards work. Work part time, change career, what ever you want. With regards costs, this is an expensive process. You should budget 30k for total costs. I also think you should research more. I am not sure why you think Australia will change your lives in the way you are looking for. It is an expensive country. The days of people moving from the terrace house in the UK to a mansion in Australia are long gone. Also, people work long hours. In fact the average is higher in Australia (longest working hours in the developed world) and many have less annual leave.
  20. verystormy

    UK National Insurance and State Pension

    No and no. It doesn't matter how long you worked in the UK, if you were resident, then you pay tax. 9 years of NI would not be sufficient to claim a state pension. You can though continue to pay NI to later qualify for it. If you are a British citizen
  21. verystormy

    History of relationship for Partner Visa

    No, they won't want 24 years of evidence. In fact they rarely go back more than a year. At most three years.
  22. verystormy

    Sending boxes from UK to WA

    We used a small move cube when we moved back, which holds plenty for what you are looking at.
  23. verystormy

    Rail jobs

    The main job site is seek.com.au which should give you an idea. Do you have visas?
  24. verystormy

    visas

    Hi. If you mean you want to use a migration agent to help do your visas, then http://www.newlifedownunder.com.au/ is highly recommended. I am assuming you have don't some initial research to look at if you qualify for a visa?
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